An Immigration Fiscal Impact Statement

By Wayne Lutton, Ph.D.
Published in The Social Contract
Volume 18, Number 2 (Winter 2007-2008)
Issue theme: "What price mass immigration?"
http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc_18_2/tsc_18_2_editor.shtml




[All articles in this Immigration Fiscal Impact Statement series can be viewed in a single pdf document]


In this issue, The Social Contract is privileged to feature Edwin Rubenstein’s Immigration Fiscal Impact Statement. Mr. Rubenstein, a noted economist and widely-published business journalist, was invited to prepare a report estimating the impact of immigration on the federal government. His examination of the budgets of fifteen federal agencies confirms that immigration adds costs to every government agency and almost all government programs. The total economic impact of mass immigration is far higher than the public has been lead to believe.


Opening the Immigration Flood Gates

Former Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan is calling on Congress to allow even higher levels of immigration, even as he admits that the U. S.economy “is on the edge of a recession.” According to Greenspan, “Significantly opening up immigration to [more] skilled workers solves two problems: Companies can hire educated workers they need. And those workers would compete with high-income people, driving more income equality.” What he really means is that salaries can be cut for educated American workers forced to compete with foreign competitors in their own country. There really is no limit to the greed of cheap labor profiteers.


Visit Our Website

We have made it easier to share articles from The Social Contract with others. When you visit our website, www.thesocialcontract.com, click on Journal Archives and then click on the cover of a particular issue. The Table of Contents will appear and you can then send any of the articles and reviews.


About the author

Wayne Lutton is Editor of The Social Contract.

Copyright 2007 The Social Contract Press, 445 E Mitchell Street, Petoskey, MI 49770; ISSN 1055-145X
(Article copyrights extend to the first date the article was published in The Social Contract)