A Note from the Editor

By Wayne Lutton, Ph.D.
Published in The Social Contract
Volume 21, Number 1 (Fall 2010)
Issue theme: "The menace of Islam"
http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc_21_1/tsc_21_1_editor.shtml




“Brace yourselves. The War with Muslims Has Just Begun.”

 

These are the words Faisal Shahzad told the federal judge who sentenced him to life in prison. Shahzad, readers will recall, is the Pakistani-born United States citizen who tried to set off a car bomb in New York’s Times Square earlier this year. He is just one of the many entrenched Islamic terrorists who have been allowed to migrate to this country.

In this issue of The Social Contract, we look at the threat posed by Islam to the United States. Stella Paul, a widely published critic, is the special guest editor for our feature section.

American officialdom, including the Chattering Class, claims that the problem is primarily coming from Muslims who embrace al Qaeda’s brand of “radical Islam.” And they go on to argue that “real Islam” is the “religion of peace.”

This is clearly misleading. There are not two different varieties of Islam, one for al Qaeda and another for the rest of Muslims. Islam itself is the problem.

Since the 9/11 attacks on the United States, federal authorities have continued to permit Muslims to settle in the United States. The State Department grants visas to Muslims from Egypt, the Sudan, Saudi Arabia, South Yemen, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Oman, the Philippines, Malaysia, Pakistan, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia. Additional Muslims arrive from Europe, often with visa waivers.

What benefit do Americans derive from having Muslims settle here? The costs have far outweighed any benefits in terms of terrorism, violent crime, and other social costs. What evidence is there that Muslim “integration” is possible? It seems clear to us that it is (past) time to halt Muslim immigration to the United States.


About the author

Wayne Lutton is editor of The Social Contract.

Copyright 2007 The Social Contract Press, 445 E Mitchell Street, Petoskey, MI 49770; ISSN 1055-145X
(Article copyrights extend to the first date the article was published in The Social Contract)