Police Officers Are Another Stolen Resource

By Dave Gibson
Published in The Social Contract
Volume 25, Number 3 (Spring 2015)
Issue theme: "How many is too many? The challenge of Latino immigrants"
http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc_25_3/tsc_25_3_gibson_2.shtml




After more than six months since Michael Brown, the violent behemoth whom the national press dubbed the “gentle giant,” was shot to death in Ferguson, Missouri, charges of racism are still being hurled at the Ferguson Police Department—and bullets as well. As of this writing (March 12, 2015), two Ferguson police officers have been shot within the last 24 hours, apparently because they were white.

When the 300-lb Brown attacked Officer Wilson, punching him in the face, and attempted to wrestle his weapon away from him, the hulking teenager had crossed a line—one which could never simply be forgotten.

Officer Wilson heroically managed to fight back Brown and gave pursuit. Of course, Brown then charged the officer once again, according to witnesses. That’s when Officer Wilson performed the ultimate public service and ended the violent life of what appeared to be little more than a rabid animal.

It is often said that when a police officer is killed, that officer’s fellow brothers and sisters in blue really drop everything else to go after the cop killer. While they do not “drop everything else,” it is true that an extra effort is given to catching the officer’s murderer.

Perhaps, people should ask themselves: If someone is so brazen as to kill an armed police officer, just how much consideration do you think that perpetrator would give to the life of an unarmed citizen?

While the Justice Department recently announced that no charges will be filed against Officer Wilson, the Obama Administration is easily the most anti-cop in U.S. history, and has done their level best to foment racism against white cops.

Of course, Obama no longer simply has to rely on angry young black men to kill the nation’s police officers; he now has an ever-growing population of illegal aliens to exact what the community organizer-in-chief sees as nothing more than “a measure of social justice.”

Though the following list of officers who have been killed by illegal aliens may seem somewhat lengthy, it is but a fraction of the men and women in blue, whose lives were ended by those who have no right to be here...

Trooper Bret Clodfelter,
Oregon State Police

On September 30, 1992, 34-year-old Trooper Bret Clodfelter stopped a suspected drunk driver who turned out to be an illegal alien named Francisco Manzo-Hernandez. The drunken driver was traveling with two of his fellow invaders. Trooper Clodfelter handcuffed the driver and placed him in the back seat of his cruiser.

As all of the men were drunk, the state trooper offered to drive the two passengers home. For his kindness, Clodfelter was shot in the head four times. All three fled the scene and were captured a few days later.

Trooper Clodfelter served with the Oregon State Police for eight years and left behind a wife, son, and daughter. A further tragedy took place a year after the trooper’s murder, when his wife, Rene, took her own life.

Officer Rodney Johnson,
Houston Police Department

On September 21, 2006, Officer Rodney Johnson was shot and killed while making a routine traffic stop. The man that murdered him had been deported back to Mexico seven years earlier. However, due to the federal government’s refusal to defend the Mexican border, this human predator easily re-entered the United States, eventually killing Johnson.

Officer Johnson stopped a commercial vehicle traveling 20 miles over the posted speed limit. The truck was driven by Mexican national Juan Leonardo Quintero. A co-worker and Quintero’s two step-daughters were also in the vehicle.

When Quintero was unable to provide any form of identification, Officer Johnson handcuffed him and placed him in the backseat of his patrol car. Once the officer was once again seated behind the wheel, Quintero removed the 9-mm handgun concealed in his waistband and began firing at Johnson through the plastic shield separating the front and back seats. Johnson was shot in the head five times. He was pronounced dead shortly after being taken to a local hospital.

Forty-year-old Officer Rodney Johnson was a 12-year veteran of the Houston Police Department and a U.S. Army veteran. While serving on the HPD, Officer Johnson received two Lifesaving Awards.

He left behind his wife Joslyn (also a police officer) and five children.

In 2006, Clara Rodriguez, who lived in the neighborhood where Johnson patrolled, had this to say about the murdered officer: “He was just so very nice. He was not ever mean. It just breaks my heart. I feel so very bad for his wife. He got up and went to work this morning, and this is what happened. This is what happened to one of the people who protects us, who truly took care of us.”

Juan Leonardo Quintero had prior arrests in Houston. He is a convicted child molester and DUI offender, and was deported to Mexico by U.S. immigration officials in 1999. He had been working for a Houston area landscaping company and, despite the DUI conviction, was driving a company vehicle at the time Officer Johnson stopped him.

On May 20, 2008, a Houston jury sentenced Quintero to spend the rest of his life in prison.

Officer Kevin Will,
Houston Police Department

On May 29, 2011, Houston police arrested Johoan Rodriguez, 26, after he allegedly drove his car past a road block on the 610 North Loop, striking and killing Officer Kevin Will.

Officer Will was investigating a hit-and-run accident when he was struck by Rodriguez’ Volkswagen Bug. Though the officer could not get out of the way in time, he did manage to warn a citizen of the speeding vehicle.

The officer’s body was dragged for some distance along the highway at estimated speeds around 80 mph.

According to police, the illegal alien had .3 grams of cocaine in his pocket at the time of his arrest. He also had a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) level of .238, which is nearly three times the legal limit of .08 BAC.

Rodriguez is a member of the notoriously violent street gang known as MS-13 and has been twice deported. The illegal alien is charged with intoxication, manslaughter, evading arrest, and drug possession.

38-year-old Officer Kevin Will leaves behind a wife and their two children, ages 6 and 10. At the time of his death, his wife was also six months pregnant.

Deputy Loren Lily,

Cobb County (Ga.) Sheriff’s Department

On December 31, 2006, illegal alien Joel Camacho Perea drove into Dep. Lily’s path on Powder Springs Road, hitting and killing him. Perea then fled the scene and was later captured and charged with hit-and-run and vehicular homicide.

Dep. Lily, 41, who was an 18-year veteran of the Cobb County Sheriff’s Deptartment had only been married to his wife Jamie for four months when he was killed. He left behind his wife and two godchildren.

Deputy Brian Tephord,
Broward County (Fla.) Sheriff’s Department

On November 12, 2006, Deputy Tephord made a routine traffic stop, while sitting in his patrol car, running the suspects’ information, when Bahamian nationals Andre Delancey and Bernard Forbes opened fire on him. Tehord was taken to the hospital, where he died an hour later.

Delancey was arrested in 2004 on gun charges and should have been deported, but was allowed to remain in the U.S.

Deputy Tephord, 34 left behind a wife and three young children.

Officer Daryl Raetz,
Phoenix Police Department

On May 19, 2013, police in Phoenix arrested Jesus Cabrera Molina, 24, after he reportedly hit and killed Raetz as he was conducting a DUI traffic stop.

Officer Raetz, 29, had been with the Phoenix Police Department for six years, and was a veteran of the Iraq War. He leaves behind a wife and one child.

Officer Tony Zeppetella,
Oceanside (Calif.) Police Department

On June 13, 2003, previously deported gang member Adrian Camacho shot Officer Zeppetella 13 times during a routine traffic stop. Camacho received the death penalty for the murder.

Officer Zeppetella, 27, had been on the job for only one year when he was killed, and left behind a wife and a 6-month-old son.

Deputy David March,
Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department

On April 29, 2002, Deputy March was shot to death by Armondo Garcia, whose friends later said he told them that he wanted to kill a police officer.

Garcia saw Deputy March on patrol one evening, pulled over and waited for him to drive past him. As soon as March began to pass, Garcia opened fire. The Mexican national quickly fled back across the border.

For four years, the government of Mexico refused to apprehend or extradite Garcia. In February 2006, U.S. Customs officers arrested Garcia in Mexico. He pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison.

Deputy March, 33, served with the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department for seven years and left behind a wife and stepdaughter.

Detective Donald Young,
Denver Police Department

On May 8, 2005, Det. Young was working at an event hall when he was shot to death in an unprovoked attack by Raul Garcia-Gomez.

The Mexican national had already been arrested three times when he murdered Det. Young, but because of Denver’s ‘sanctuary policy’ he was never reported to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Garcia-Gomez actually worked in a restaurant owned by Denver Mayor Hickenlooper, who has been a longtime champion of sanctuary policies.

Det. Young, 43, left behind a wife and three children.

U.S. Park Ranger Kris Eggle

On August 9, 2002, Ranger Eggle was killed by Mexican drug dealers while on duty in Arizona’s Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument Park. Eggle was attempting to apprehend two smugglers, after being notified by Mexican authorities that the two had crossed the border and were headed into the park.

One of the drug dealers opened fire on Ranger Eggle with an AK-47. He died before a medevac helicopter arrived on the scene. Mexican police officers shot and killed Eggle’s murderer.

U.S. Park Ranger Eggle, 27, left behind his grieving parents and his sister (also a U.S. Park Ranger).

Deputy Brandy Lyn Winfield,
Marion County (Ohio) Sheriff’s Department

On October 14, 2004, Deputy Winfield was called to investigate a disabled vehicle, and had stopped to talk to two men on the side of the road. One of the men, Juan Carlos Cruz, shot and killed him. Cruz, who pleaded guilty to the murder, has never expressed any remorse for his actions.

Deputy Winfield, 29, left behind a wife and two children.

Officer Gregory Bailey,
California Highway Patrol

On February 25, 2006, Domingo Esqueda hit and killed Officer Bailey while performing a routine traffic stop. Esqueda’s BAC was three times the legal limit.

Officer Bailey, 36, was also a member of the California National Guard and had just returned from Iraq when he was killed. He left behind a wife and four children.

Officer Vincent Owen D’Anna,
Flint (Mich.) Police Department

On August 29, 2007, drunk-driving Mexican national Ramon Felix Pineda hit Officer D’Anna, who was riding his motorcycle off-duty. Pineda actually dragged Officer D’Anna, who was pinned under his car, for some distance. Pineda jumped from his car and fled on foot, until he was apprehended by a citizen.

It was discovered that Pineda had been living in the U.S. for ten years.

Officer D’Anna was 26 years old.

Officer Nick Erfle,
Phoenix Police Department

On September 18, 2007, Officer Erfle had stopped a group of men who were obstructing traffic when one of the men, Mexican national Erik Martinez, then shot and killed him. Martinez had been deported in 2006 for theft charges, but was able to easily re-enter the U.S.

Officer Erfle, 33, left behind a wife and two children.

Officer Gary Gryder,
Houston Police Department

On June 29, 2008, Officer Gryder was working traffic control when drunken Vietnamese national Hing Trong crashed through a construction barrier and ran him over. Officer Gryder was taken to the hospital where he later died of his injuries.

Several witnesses claimed that when Trong was laughing as he was taken into custody.
 Officer Gryder was a 23-year veteran of the Houston Police Deptartment, and left behind a wife and three children.

Officer Andrew Widman,
Fort Myers (Fla.) Police Department

On July 18, 2008, Officer Widman responded to a domestic disturbance call at a local convenience store, when Cuban national Abel Arango turned on Officer Widman and shot him to death.

Arango was then shot and killed by other officers. He had actually been ordered deported in 2000.

Officer Widman, 30, left behind a wife and three children.

Officer Shane Figueroa,
Phoenix Police Department

Officer Figueroa was responding to a “shots fired” call when his patrol car was hit by a pick-up truck driven by Mexican national Salvador Vivas-Diaz, who was drunk at the time. Vivas-Diaz had a history of DUI arrests and had been previously deported.

Officer Figueroa, 25, left behind a wife and a 3-month-old baby.

Officer Marc Atkinson,
Phoenix Police Department

On March 26, 1999, Officer Atkinson, 28, was shot and killed by illegal alien Felipe Petrona-Cabana. Officer Anderson was ambushed by Cabana while on routine patrol.

Cabana was traveling with two other illegal aliens and carrying a pound of cocaine. An armed citizen named Rory Vertigan witnessed the shooting and helped capture the outlaws.

Officer Atkinson served on the Phoenix Police Department for five years. He left behind a wife and an infant son.

Officer Brandon Mendoza,
Mesa (Ariz.) Police Department

On May 12, 2014, Officer Mendoza was headed home on U.S. 60, when he was hit head-on by Raul Silva Corona, who was drunk and traveling in the wrong direction on the highway in Tempe, Ariz.

Mendoza was taken to a local hospital, where he died from his injuries.

32-year-old Officer Mendoza, was a thirteen-year veteran of the Mesa Police Department. He volunteered his time at the Boys and Girls Club, was an animal lover, and recently fostered a homeless pit bull he named Lucy Blu.

Deputy Michael Davis,
Placer County (Calif.) Sheriff’s Department


On October 24, 2014, Deputy Davis pulled over a pick-up truck driven by Luis Enrique Monroy-Bracamonte , a twice-deported illegal alien drug dealer, who opened fire on the deputy with an AR-15.

 Davis was taken to a local hospital, where he was later pronounced dead. 

34-year-old Deputy Davis served with the Placer County Sheriff’s Department for 15 years.

Deputy Daniel Oliver,
Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department

On October 24, 2014, Deputy Oliver pulled into a Motel 6 parking lot, as he was responding to a “suspicious vehicle” call. As he approached the vehicle, Luis Enrique Monroy-Bracamonte opened fire on Oliver, as well as his partner. Oliver was shot in the head at close range and died at the scene.


Deputy Oliver was a 15-year veteran of the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department. He left behind a wife and two daughters.

Officer Henry Canales,
Houston Police Department

On June 23, 2009, Officer Canales was shot to death by a Mexican national while assigned to an undercover operation targeting a group of individuals trafficking in stolen merchandise.

The illegal alien, Roberto Carrillo, was then shot to death by other officers.

Carrillo was deported in 1999 and had actually been ticketed four times since 2002, but was never reported to federal immigration authorities, due to Houston’s sanctuary policy.

Officer Canales was a military veteran and served with the Houston Police Department for 16 years. He left behind a wife, a son, and a daughter.

Officer Andy Chavez,
Elmore (Ohio) Police Department


On March 9, 2014, Officer Chavez was off duty, celebrating his birthday with his wife at a local bar, when Igmidio Mista became verbally abusive with the officer’s wife. The illegal alien punched the woman in the face and ran from the bar.

Moments later, Mista returned and opened fire, killing three people, including Chavez. A customer and the bartender were also shot to death.

26-year-old Officer Chavez served with the Elmore Police Department for two years, and left behind a wife and two small children.


Unlike all other crimes, those committed by illegal aliens are 100 percent preventable. Contrary to what both the Republican and Democrat Party leadership would tell you, it is really very simple...If they are not here, then they are not here to commit the crime.

About the author

Dave Gibson, a former legislative aide to a Virginia state senator, has been working as a freelance writer for many years. His work has been published in many newspapers and magazines, including the Washington Times.

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