Polls of Muslim-Americans

By The Editors
Published in The Social Contract
Volume 26, Number 4 (Summer 2016)
Issue theme: "Islam in America"
http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc_26_4/tsc-26-4-polls.shtml



The Polling Company CSP Poll (2015): 24 percent of Muslim-Americans say that violence is justified against those who “offend Islam” (60 percent disagree). http://www.centerforsecuritypolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/150612-CSP-Polling-Company-Nationwide-Online-Survey-of-Muslims-Topline-Poll-Data.pdf

The Polling Company CSP Poll (2015): 29 percent of Muslim-Americans agree that violence against those who insult Muhammad or the Quran is acceptable (61 percent disagree). http://www.centerforsecuritypolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/150612-CSP-Polling-Company-Nationwide-Online-Survey-of-Muslims-Topline-Poll-Data.pdf

The Polling Company CSP Poll (2015): 33 percent of Muslim-Americans say that Sharia should be supreme to the U.S. Constitution (43 percent disagree). http://www.centerforsecuritypolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/150612-CSP-Polling-Company-Nationwide-Online-Survey-of-Muslims-Topline-Poll-Data.pdf

The Polling Company CSP Poll (2015): 51 percent of Muslim-Americans say that Muslims should have the choice of being judged by Sharia courts rather than U.S. courts (39 percent disagree). http://www.centerforsecuritypolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/150612-CSP-Polling-Company-Nationwide-Online-Survey-of-Muslims-Topline-Poll-Data.pdf

Pew Research (2011): 20 percent of Muslim-Americans want to be distinct (56 percent support assimilation). http://www.people-press.org/2011/08/30/muslim-americans-no-signs-of-growth-in-alienation-or-support-for-extremism/

Pew Research (2011): 49 percent of Muslim-Americans say they are “Muslim first” (26 percent American first)
http://www.people-press.org/2011/08/30/muslim-americans-no-signs-of-growth-in-alienation-or-support-for-extremism/

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